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Coffee pulp waste

Researchers dumped tons of coffee pulp on degraded lands

  1. Work published in Ecological Solutions and Evidence has shown that locally sourced nutrient-rich coffee pulp—an often discarded by-product of coffee production—can jump start forest regrowth
  2. Coffee pulp is generally considered to be a waste product from the coffee industry but a waste product that should be further evaluated for potential uses (Rathinavelu and Graziosi, 2005). Coffee pulp is reported to function as a substrate for microbial processes and have antioxidant behavior
  3. Coffee pulp is one of the major underutilized byproduct of coffee processing in farm level. Disposal of this agro-industrial waste has become one of the most challenging tasks for coffee planters. However, most of the efforts are towards the management of coffee pulp as an effluent, and not-on re-use
  4. To get coffee beans, producers remove the fruit's skin, pulp, and other filmy bits. They then dry and roast the remains to make the grounds that end up in your morning cup. Approximately half the..
  5. Nowadays, most of the coffee pulp goes without treatment directly to huge waste disposal sites without any treatment. When this waste is dumped, it pollutes the environment in the coffee producing regions by leaching compounds into rivers, lakes and soil
  6. One of those waste products is coffee pulp. This is the discarded fibrous husk created when coffee cherries are processed. And, according to an ex-Starbucks entrepreneur, it piles up around coffee mills, polluting nearby waterways. But instead of being a problem, could this waste product become a solution
  7. Researchers have witnessed incredible results after dumping 30 truckloads of coffee pulp, a waste product of the coffee industry, onto an area of degraded former farmland in Costa Rica. Marking out a control area of a similar size, they were astounded by the change over the next two years

Coffee Pulp - an overview ScienceDirect Topic

  1. Coffee factory wastewaters contain high concentration of organics such as sugars, peptides phenols and pectines. Nutrient concentrations in pulpery wastewater have low values of Nitrogen Phosphorus and Sulphur (Refer Table 1.0)
  2. For example, in wet processing of coffee beans, 1,000 kilograms of fresh berry results in about 400 kilograms of wet waste pulp. If that waste pulp isn't properly disposed of, it easily ends up in the surrounding water sources and results in pollution
  3. ate up to 40 times more water than your average urban sewer wastage. This level of wastage has a huge impact. Fortunately, it doesn't have to be that way
  4. Coffee pulp - a waste product in coffee production - could be used to speed up recovery of tropical forests on post-agricultural land, according to researchers. Coffee pulp - the residual parts of coffee left over after separating the seed from the fruit components - comprises of some 50% of the weight of a typical coffee harvest

Utilization of coffee pulp waste for rapid recovery of

Coffee pulp (C.P.) is a waste of coffee production that needs to be controlled. Due to its high moisture and sugar content, a diagnostic study that characterizes the pulp was conducted and the potential for hydrogen production was evaluated. Subsequently, the kinetics of hydrogen production in a bioreactor were evaluated Global coffee production creates in excess of 23 million tons of waste per year, according to sustainability researcher Gunter Pauli, from the pulp of fresh coffee cherries through the packaging that brings the roasted beans to your favorite barista Every year, millions of tons of coffee pulp waste are generated and finding a way to not only dispose of this waste in an ecologically sound manner, but also use it for habitat recovery is a win-win for everybody. It is exceedingly rare for industry to be able to pair up so seamlessly with conservation and restoration that it is hard to believe Agricultural waste, particularly lignocellulose, has been used in the second generation of biogas. Coffee pulp and chicken feathers can be developed as biogas raw materials because of their. Coffee by-products pose a major challenge to the coffee supply chain. Farmers discard more than half of the coffee fruit's pulp, mucilage, and parchment often ends up polluting nearby land. Polluted water can create environmental problems, since it's often channelled back into local waters when it creates dangerous algae

Coffee pulp helps Costa Rican forests grow back from

Spreading coffee pulp, a waste product from coffee production, over degraded lands helps them recover quickly, a recent study found. By dumping 30 truck-loads of coffee pulp on a plot of degraded land in Costa Rica, researchers watched a small forest grow at a remarkable speed in just two years, the British Ecological Society reported The fungus, known as cellulase producer Aspergillus sp. VT12 under solid-state fermentation (SSF) using coffee pulp based has been isolated. Investigation showed that optimum cellulase production by this isolate when SSF of 10 g coffee pulp, inoculated with 10 8 spores/ml, incubated at 30°C for 120 hours was done. Cellulase activity reached 1.

Unlocking the potential of coffee pulp - Pectco

  1. The residual coffee 'pulp', which comprises >50% by weight of the coffee harvest, is commonly treated as a waste product and heaped into storage lots where it is left to decompose (Ferrell & Cockerill, 2012; Sanchez et al., 1999)
  2. In this study, the composting and co-composting potential of coffee husk and pulp with source-separated municipal solid waste (SSMSW) was investigated. Coffee husk and pulp were mixed independently with SSMSW in different proportions (0, 33, 50 and 100%), and composted in triplicates with a total of 24 composting piles for 3 months. From each compost type, different physicochemical parameters.
  3. Coffee pulp is a waste material from the coffee industry. Rathinavelu and Graziosi [7] showed that it can replace up to 20% of commercial concentrates in dairy cattle feeding, with no adverse effects and a 30% cost savings. 4.2. In pigs . Dried coffee pulp is accepted by pigs from 8 to 16
  4. It's also a lot of waste. And I'm not just talking about coffee grounds. There is a lot of other waste that comes from turning a coffee cherry into a coffee bean. One of these waste products is coffee pulp. This is the discarded fibers husk created when coffee cherries are processed and according to an ex Starbucks entrepreneur, it piles up.
  5. of liquid, dried and wet coffee pulp. Coffee pulp waste is generated in large quantities when coffee cherry processed by wet pulping method [17,20,21], which is known to contain 23e27% fermentable sugars on dry weight basis [17,20]. Consequently, most of the coffee pulp remains unutilized i
  6. image: Coffee pulp delivery (Day 1) view more Credit: Rebecca Cole. A new study finds that coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, can be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on.
  7. 2.1. Coffee Pulp Waste. The coffee pulp waste was obtained from the plantation of Coope Unión R.L. in Tres Ríos, Cartago, Costa Rica. After the extraction of the coffee beans, the pulp obtained was stored at -18 °C. Before its use, the pulp was left at room temperature to defrost and milled in a screw grinder (Kramer-Grebe)

Coffee Waste Good for Soil. From Epoch Times. An excerpt. Researchers have witnessed incredible results after dumping 30 truckloads of coffee pulp, a waste product of the coffee industry, onto an area of degraded former farmland in Costa Rica. Marking out a control area of a similar size, they were astounded by the change over the next two. Read time:3 minutes. A new study finds that coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, can be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on post agricultural land. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society journal Ecological Solutions and Evidence. In the study, researchers from ETH-Zurich and the University of Hawai`i. Coffee lovers no longer have to worry about the waste they generate from coffee pulp, just like tea and fresh juice lovers. All the pulp of tea, coffee, and juice can be decomposed and used as fertilizers for vegetation or forestation. Although the properties of the pulp of all three are vastly different from each other, the uses have similar. Circular economy in coffee production: The potential to reuse coffee pulp, organic waste from pruning and other field activities as well as waste water from coffee processing is underestimated. Used efficiently these wastes can enhance the productivity of coffee farms and help to reduce the use of agrochemicals Coffee pulp arrivesCredit: Rebecca Cole/British Ecological Society The researchers delivered 30 dump trucks full of coffee pulp to a 35- by 40-meter parcel on Reserva Biológica Sabalito in Costa.

The study suggests that, as a widely-available waste product rich in nutrients, the coffee pulp can provide a double-edged, cost-effective solution to the climate crisis by aiding forest restoration. This case study suggests that agricultural by-products can be used to speed up forest recovery on degraded tropical lands A new study finds that coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, can be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on post-agricultural land, according to the British Ecological Society journal report. In the study, researchers from ETH-Zurich and the University of Hawaii spread 30 dump truck loads of coffee pulp on a 35 × 40m area of. Coffee pulp steps up to be a cost-effective and easily-accessible forest restoration strategy since it is a widely available waste product, not to mention its high nutritional content

What If Starbucks Dumped Its Waste in the Amazon? What

The pulp, which comprises more than 50% by weight of the coffee harvest, is treated as a waste product and heaped into storage lots where it is left to decompose. But there's actually much more. Capturing protein from grain waste after the brew process. Also, ecologists are finding that the high nutrient coffee pulp can regenerate exhausted farmland soil to quickly regrow forests. Coffee pulp is the leftover dried fleshy fruit taken off the coffee bean that we are all familiar with. Pile of coffee cherries ready to be dried Researchers spread coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, across old agricultural land measuring 35 x 40m. The plot recovered four times faster than a control area. Talk about a caffeine boost. The results were dramatic, said Dr Rebecca Cole from the University of Hawai'i, lead author of the study. The area treated with a.

Researchers Dump Tons of Coffee Waste Onto Degraded Land

Spreading coffee pulp, a waste product from coffee production, over degraded lands helps them recover quickly, a recent study found. By dumping 30 truck-loads of coffee pulp on a plot of degraded land in Costa Rica, researchers watched a small forest grow at a remarkable speed in just two years, the British Ecological Society reported Coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, could be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on post agricultural land, suggests a new study. In the study published in the journal. Coffee production is a wasteful business. The whole song and dance (separating the beans from the cherries, chucking out the cherries' biomass, etc.) lands around 10 million tons of coffee pulp. The effect of two abundant, easily available and very low-cost agro-industrial organic residues, i.e., filter cake from the sugar industry and poultry litter, on the composting stabilization time of coffee pulp and on the quality of the produced compost, was evaluated. Piles of one cubic meter were This was found in a direct case-control study of degraded tropical land in Costa Rica, where scientists from the University of Hawai'i and ETH-Zurich spread 30 dump truck loads of coffee pulp.

Agricultural waste, particularly lignocellulose, has been used in the second generation of biogas. Coffee pulp and chicken feathers can be developed as biogas raw materials because of their. Abstract The present work describes the production of novel highly hydrated cellulose microfibrils (CMFs) with unique morphology from coffee pulp waste using specific chemical treatments. The as-produced CMFs were successfully characterized and then used as an adsorbent for removal of methylene blue (MB) from concentrated aqueous solutions. Surprisingly, it was found that the novel CMFs. Unfortunately, the coffee industry produces a huge amount of waste: every year, more than 23 million tons of waste, in fact. A nd much of that is from something called coffee pulp . The unprocessed form of coffee is a bright red or yellow fruit called a coffee cherry Using coffee pulp and pelusa in compost is only one of many uses for those materials. Pelusa can be used as a fuel source and there has sprung up a veritable coffee industry around testing and finding new uses for coffee pulp, from animal feed to mushroom cultivation to biogas to tea to flour. As in, flour for baking These processes generate a lot of solid wastes (by-products) and waste water. The main solid by-products from cultivation and preparation of coffee are 91 fspent coffee grounds, by-products of coffee fruit (coffee cherry) and bean processing (coffee husks, peel, pulp). Huge amount of contaminated waters are also produced in several washing.

Wastewater from Coffee Processing Industry and Its Treatmen

University of Stuttgart works with Costa Rican cooperative to turn coffee waste into compost. May 28, 2021. STUTTGART, Germany - The pulp of coffee beans is considered a waste product on coffee plantations, which is usually thrown away or dumped into rivers - with significant negative consequences for climate change and the environment Coffee pulp solid waste is being conditions. converted into compost, which was used by the suppliers in fertilizing their coffee farms. Waste water management The amount of oxygen needed to biologically break down techniques used by the coffee pulping operators are based on organic wastes diluted in water (BOD) could be as high as the use of. Similarly, we have to identify and assess the alternative pathways for the waste utilization, i.e. utilization of pulp, husk, or spent coffee grounds for energy production (Murthy and Naidu, 2012; Gurram et al., 2016). This analysis, in conjunction with feedback from experimentalists, can help towards the identification of sustainable CE coffee.

Coffee pulp - a waste product that makes up more than half the coffee harvest - could be the secret ingredient to return rainforests to areas where they were destroyed, according to a new. Coffee waste can boost forest recovery: Study. Prime News, International, New York, March 30:- Coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, could be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on post agricultural land, suggests a new study. In the study published in the journal 'Ecological Solutions and Evidence', the team spread 30. Credit: Rebecca Cole. LONDON, UK - A new study finds that coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, can be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on post agricultural land. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society journal Ecological Solutions and Evidence. In the study, researchers from ETH-Zurich and the. waste, chicken feces [6]. Another potential waste raw material for biogas production is food industry waste [7]. Coffee is one of the largest commodities in world trade after crude oil. Coffee pulp waste has a good fiber and protein content of 17% and 10.4%, respectively, and is processed for another purpose [8]

What is Cascara? - Fresh Cup Magazine

Coffee pulp is a waste material from the coffee industry. Rathinavelu and Graziosi showed that it can replace up to 20% of commercial concentrates in dairy cattle feeding,with no adverse effects and a 30% cost savings. 4.2. In pigs. Dried coffee pulp is accepted by pigs from 8 to 16% in the ration [15-16] the range of 0.9-1.45 million tons of agricultural waste being generated each year. Coffee husks (CHs) and cof-fee pulp (CP) are the solid residues obtained after de-hulling the coffee cherries during dry or wet processing, respectively. They are probably the major residues from the processing of coffee, for which there are no profitabl Canopy height >5 m was >40% in the coffee pulp but was negligible (<3%) in the control treatment. 5. Our study highlights the significant potential for using agricultural waste, such as coffee pulp, to jump start forest succession on degraded tropical lands and encourages further research to optimize linkages between agro industry and restoration Forests on caffeine: coffee waste can boost forest recovery. 29th March 2021. A new study finds that coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, can be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on post agricultural land. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society journal Ecological Solutions and Evidence

Coffee Waste or Product Potential? - Fresh Cup Magazin

  1. Coffee pulp, the byproduct of coffee production that ends up as waste, could be upcycled and used to speed up tropical forest recovery. In a new study, scientists found dramatic results, with a small forest emerging in post agricultural land just two years after being treated with coffee waste
  2. imal impact on biodiversity and envi- coffee producing regions of Jimma Zone and to suggest ronment (Perfecto et al. 1996; López-Gómez et al.
  3. Researchers have witnessed incredible results after dumping 30 truckloads of coffee pulp, a waste product of the coffee industry, onto an area of degraded former farmland in Costa Rica. Marking.
  4. A new study finds that coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, can be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on post agricultural land. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society journal Ecological Solutions and Evidence. In the study, researchers from ETH-Zurich and the University of Hawai`i spread 30 dump truck.
  5. Coffee pulp biomass waste can easily be found anywhere in Indonesia, considering it is the fourth world's largest coffee exporter. The utilization of coffee pulp is very limited and is categorized as a source of pollutants in water bodies and soils. In contrast, coffee pulp waste is very potential because 63% of the main compound is cellulose
  6. Coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, could be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on post agricultural land, suggests a new study. In the study published in the journal 'Ecological Solutions and Evidence', the team spread 30 dump truck loads of coffee pulp on a 35-40m area of degraded land and marked out a similar sized.

Video: How Can We Minimise Waste in the Coffee Industry

Coffee wastewater, also known as coffee effluent, is a byproduct of coffee processing.Its treatment and disposal is an important environmental consideration for coffee processing as wastewater is a form of industrial water pollution.. The unpicked fruit of the coffee tree, known as the coffee cherry, undergoes a long process to make it ready for consumption Coffee by-products are potential threats for environmental quality and human health in coffee growing regions of Southwest Ethiopia, Bench Sheko Zone in particular. For example, every 100 kg of fresh coffee berry gives about 40 kg of wet coffee pulp waste [10, 11] @article{osti_5062370, title = {Recycling agroindustrial waste by lactic fermentations: coffee pulp silage}, author = {Carrizales, V and Ferrer, J}, abstractNote = {This UNIDO publication on lactic acid fermentation of coffee pulp for feed production covers (1) a process which can be adapted to existing coffee processing plants for drying the product once harvesting time has finished (2) unit. The pulp of coffee beans is considered a waste product on coffee plantations, which is usually thrown away or dumped into rivers - with significant negative consequences for climate change and the environment. Macarena San Martín-Ruiz from the University of Stuttgart is working with Coopetarrazú, the largest coffee cooperative in Costa Rica, to find out how the mixture of pulp and husks can. Coffee pulp, a waste product generated by its production, could be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on post-agricultural land, suggests a new study. For the study, the team spread 30 dump.

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'Coffee pulp can be a cost-effective forest restoration

Coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, could be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on post agricultural land, suggests a new study. In the study published in the journal 'Ecological Solutions and Evidence', the team spread 30 dump truck loads of coffee pulp on a 35-40m area of degraded land and marked out a similar sized area. step yielding coffee pulp, mucilage, and waste waters on the one hand, and coffee beans with hulls on the other; the second operation is a dry processing step that sep- arates the hulls from the coffee beans. A more detailed flow diagram is shown in Fig. 3 (Cleves 1976). This is a modern pilo Typically, the pulp produced on coffee farms is composted. This is similar to the usual fate of pomace — the seeds, skins, stems and other pulpy matter left over after grapes are pressed for wine New York: Coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, could be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on post agricultural land, suggests a new study. In the study published in the journal 'Ecological Solutions and Evidence', the team spread 30 dump truck loads of coffee pulp on a 35-40m area of degraded land and marked out a.

A new study finds that coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, can be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on post agricultural land. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society journal Ecological Solutions and Evidence. The recovering forest 3 years after coffee pulp was applied to the area. Credit: Rebecca Cole Researchers Dump Tons of Coffee Waste Onto Degraded Land, 2 Years Later It's Transformed. BY LOUISE BEVAN. May 21, 2021 Updated: May 21, 2021. Researchers have witnessed incredible results after dumping 30 truckloads of coffee pulp, a waste product of the coffee industry, onto an area of degraded former farmland in Costa Rica. Marking out a. Daily Coffee News covers coffee news from seed to cup, including stories on coffee origin, imports, exports, logistics, supply chains, sustainability, retail, baristas, roasting and consumer trends. Coffee pulp, a natural organic byproduct of coffee processing, can exponentially speed up tropical forest recovery on previously deforested lands Coffee waste can boost forest recovery, claims study. London [UK], March 29 (ANI): A new study by researchers at the British Ecological Society finds that coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, can be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on post-agricultural land. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society. A new study finds that coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, can be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on post agricultural land. The findings have been published in the British Ecological Society journal Ecological Solutions and Evidence.. In the study, researchers from ETH-Zurich and the University of Hawai`i spread 30 dump truck loads of coffee pulp on a 35 × 40m area.

Utilization of Coffee Husk and Pulp Waste as Soil

A layer of soft pulp surrounds coffee beans when they are harvested. This pulp is removed with abrasive rollers and a flow of water. The bean that remains is dried and, later, roasted. For at least twenty years, Vincent has had inquiries about processing the wet pulp into a by-product. Generally, the goal was to convert the pulp into animal. With the sheer volume of coffee that is consumed, there is the potential for a great deal of waste. What is the industry doing to mitigate this waste and how can you make a difference at home? Using Cascara What's cascara? Cascara is the leftover pulp from when the coffee bean is extracted from the cherry. It is the by-product of coffee processing. It may seem surprising, but cascara was once. Coffee pulp, mucilage and water from ecological coffee processing equipment were loaded in layers in three containers. The amount loaded in the tanks each week varied simulating a stacking facility during the coffee processing season. The total amount of coffee pulp loaded in the tanks was determined using design parameters from a previous project

This Man Is Making Brownies from Discarded Coffee Bean

Coffee is an excellent commodity in Indonesia that has big problem in utilizing its wastes. As the solution, the abundant coffee pulp waste from processing of coffee bean industry has been used as a substrate of biogas production. Coffee pulp waste (CPW) was approximately 48% of total weight, consisting 42% of the coffee pulp and 6% of the seed coat A new study finds that coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, can be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on post agricultural land. The findings are published in the British Ecol Coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, can be used to help speed up tropical forest recovery on post-agricultural land, according to a new study, the findings of which have been. Coffee is made from roasted coffee beans, the seeds of the coffee plant. When harvested, the seeds still look like red or yellow berries and before they are dried, roasted and ground, the skin and pulp has to be removed. This means that about half of the original total weight of the seeds becomes unused waste A new study finds that coffee pulp may be the key to reforestation. Long before consumers took an interest in finding alternate uses for coffee pulp, the best bet for keeping it from going to waste entirely was composting the nutrient-rich byproduct to use as fertilizer. As reported by Anthropocene, coffee pulp's efficacy to that end may be.

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Coffee pulp, a coffee production byproduct, can speed up tropical forest recovery on land that had been clear cut for agricultural use. A new study by the University of Hawaii and ETH-Zurich researchers found the widely available waste material boosts plant growth substantially - 80% of the forest grew back on land that had been covered with coffee pulp compared to only 20% on land that had not Coffee Flour is a social enterprise operating within the waste reuse movement, taking the by-product of coffee milling operations, specifically the pulp and skin of the discarded coffee cherry, and turning it into a nutritionally dense flour that is now being incorporated into the products of food and beverage companies around the world

(PDF) Review: Utilization of Waste From Coffee Productio

Polysaccharides rich coffee pulp is one of some abundant agricultural waste in Indonesia. The pulp also contains protein which may lead to be an important source for industrial bioprocessing. Under solid-state fermentation (SSF) by Pestalotiosis sp VM9 using of this pulp, reducing sugar was produced 392.35 μg/ml after 6 days incubation at 30°C New York, March 29 : Coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, could be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on post agricultural land, suggests a new study. In the study published in the journal 'Ecological Solutions and Evidence', the team spread 30 dump truck loads of coffee pulp on a 35-40m area of degraded land and marked out a similar sized area without coffee pulp as a.

Coffee pulp, also identified as coffee fruit without seeds, or beans, is an abundant agricultural by-product. It represents around 43% of the weight of the coffee fruit on a fresh weight basis, or approximately 28% (26-30%) of the coffee fruit on a dry weight basis. The other by-products of coffee fruit processing are the mucilage, about 5% (5. IMAGE: Coffee pulp delivery (Day 1) view more Credit: Rebecca Cole. A new study finds that coffee pulp, a waste product of coffee production, can be used to speed up tropical forest recovery on. Keywords: Coffee pulp waste, cow dung, biogas, kinetic parameter 1. INTRODUCTION In these recent years, the energy issue in the form of decreasing fossil energy reserves is a crucial problem that is being faced worldwide, including Indonesia

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Researchers dumped coffee pulp (coffee production waste) on 30 dump trucks into the devastated land of Costa Rica and brought it back to life with impressive results. On the land of Costa Rica, the pulp of coffee is on top.Credit: Researcher. Devastated land Is a comprehensive term for plots of land with low carbon storage, that is, low. x 2. Sattler M, Lukacs A, Hengevoss D (2010) Development and implementation of technology for environmentally friendly burning of coffee pulp waste in El Salvador. Final Report Okozentrum Langenbruck for REPIC. [Entwicklung und Implementierung einer Technologie zur umweltfreundlichen Verbrennung von Kaffeefruchtfleischabfallen in El Salvador The idea stuck with him when he began working in Costa Rica and took notice of the waste generated by the country's large coffee industry. If the excess coffee pulp could be put to good use. One of these techniques utilizes coffee pulp, which is often a waste product from the coffee growing industry. Coffee beans come from the pit of a cherry like fruit, after extracting and drying the beans, growers have no further need of the fruit's meat, only the bean